What makes Silicon Valley special? – Information is a Commodity

Last week one of our competitors began the process of shutting it’s doors: StartupLinkup. On the top of their home page you can now read the following:
StartupLinkup.com is winding down. It was a nice experiment, but I realize it’s not the best model for connecting startup founders.
I strongly recommend that you use StartupSQUARE. Tristan, Manuel, and Marcel are the great guys there, and will make sure you get the right connections. All the best, Adrian.
This could only happen in Silicon Valley, our competitor Adrian Fritsch, started referring business to us. What makes Silicon Valley special? Cooperation. Continue reading

The Taxonomy of the Lean Startup Pivot

(warning: this post may be highly theoretical / geeky)

Last week I was planning for the worst. Having gone through 51 iterations of my mockups and gathered as much as feedback as I could with our primitive alpha, I feel confident about our basic customer problem hypothesis. Still, I play a lot of chess and like to think at least five moves ahead in the five most likely futures. So I decided to make a list of my potential pivots.

(note: For those not familiar with the term, pivot is a lean startup vocab word that states in it’s simplest form: If your business model isn’t working, change something. More on this below.) Continue reading

Someone Please Write a Blog Post about Minimum Viable Strategy

Watching Dave McClure‘s presentation today, I started to think about how a lot of the lean startup and customer development folks talk about creating the Minimum Viable Product (MVP), Release Early / Release Often, Product / Market Fit, Pivoting, etc., etc., but there’s very little talk about choosing your market or your product strategically. (At least not that I’ve noticed, feel free to correct me.) I’d like to read that blog post.

A lot of the advice out there ultimately mitigates risks. Here is my horribly unfair summary:

  • Minimum Viable Product (MVP) – Spend less on creating your product, therefore you are risking less time and money on a bad product.
  • Release Early / Release Often – Learn in small increments, therefore you are risking less time and money on a bad product.
  • Product / Market Fit – Either change your product to fit the market or choose a different market for your product before you start spending money on marketing, therefore you are risking less time and money on a bad product.
  • Pivoting – If you have a bad product, change it to something else.

Continue reading