Caffeine Killer (Productive Chaos: How to Hurry Without Rushing p. 2)

People really like their caffeine. I guess I should’ve realized that before, but I got a bit of  flack when I suggested that caffeine was not the most efficient way to get things done in my previous post. Ok…I get it…coffee tastes great. Fair ’nuff. But I’m sticking to my guns and I’ll say it again:

If you have a cup of coffee every day, you’re not actually more awake and aware than if you didn’t have any caffeine at all.

But aside from the basic biological facts of your body normalizing to the amount of caffeine after a while, there’s a philosophical issue. Caffeine is a crutch. A lovely lovely yummy crutch that I love in sugar coated form, but a crutch none the less. Continue reading

Productive Chaos: How to Hurry Without Rushing (p. 1)

As founders, we often tend to work ridiculous hours in the hopes that more hours = more revenue. This is often not the case. Instead, we cause a lot of motion and the dust is well stirred, but little is actually accomplished. I have found that most people get about 4 productive hours out of the day, no matter how many hours they actually put in. Especially since the average “I worked a twenty hour day” usually consists of several meal breaks, watercooler BS, daydreaming, IM, office politics, chain mail, the latest viral video, sexual innuendo, and other nonsense.

I’d rather work productively for 4 hours than unproductively for 20. So I retrained my work habits until I could get a normal days work done in four hours, and then I started increasing my hours from there. Nowadays I can get a genuinely productive 16 hour day if I need to, but generally settle somewhere between 7 and 9 with a healthy amount of time for non-goal oriented learning and creative thinking. Here’s a list of little tips that have helped me, many of which come from Getting Things Done by David Allen. It’s worth a read if you’re not familiar with it. Sometime it’s a bit tedious and you’ll find that you already know 50-80% of it, but the parts you don’t know are extremely valuable. Continue reading